News

  • Monday, March 07, 2016 3:51 PM | Anonymous

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is requesting input from stakeholders as it develops the framework for a risk assessment on the use of raw manure and other biological soil amendments of animal origin as fertilizer on produce farms. Before starting the assessment, the agency wants the help of stakeholders in the produce industry, the animal agriculture industry, academia and members of the public in developing the model for this work. A notice published in the Federal Register requests public comments and scientific data and information, including information about how farms use raw manure and what strategies should be considered to reduce public health risk.  The Constituent Update addressing this announcement can be found at: http://www.fda.gov/Food/NewsEvents/ConstituentUpdates/ucm482435.htm

    For More Information

    Link to FR Notice: https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2016/03/04/2016-04712/requests-for-information-risk-assessment-of-foodborne-illness-associated-with-pathogens-from-produce

    Link to Q&A with Samir Assar: http://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/FSMA/ucm482426.htm

    Link to Produce Rule page: http://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/FSMA/ucm334114.htm

  • Friday, May 08, 2015 12:40 PM | Anonymous

    Manage Weeds and Balance Soils in Organic Tomatoes through Latest Focus on Tomato Webcast

                                                          

    Weed control for tomatoes can be a major problem for many organic vegetable farmers. It can involve different kinds of mulches, flaming, or organic herbicides. What’s more, organic weed control can have an effect on the quality of soils.

    The latest Focus on Tomato webcast, titled “Weed Control Considerations for Organic Tomato Production” explores the links between soil quality and organic weed control, including how good soil management may create an environment less favorable to weed growth.

    In this talk, Doug Doohan, Professor and State Horticulture & Crop Science Specialist at The Ohio State University, particularly explains:

    • What is meant by 'soil balancing’, and the science behind the theory of the ‘basic cation saturation ratio approach’ to soil management.

    • Why balanced soil may create an optimum environment for crops to compete with weeds.
    • How the judicious use of limestone and gypsum can improve soil quality.
    • The facts about soil balancing as well as the pseudo-science that is so commonly encountered on this subject.
    • Other proven techniques that will keep weeds under control, whether farming organically, or conventionally.

    This 42-minute presentation is open access through June 30, 2015.

    Users can view other recent webcasts in the Focus on Tomato resource at
    http://www.plantmanagementnetwork.org/fot.

    Webcasts on a variety of other crops can be found in PMN’s Education Center.

    To take advantage of PMN’s full line of resources, please sign up for the PMN Update online newsletter.


    The Plant Management Network (www.plantmanagementnetwork.org) is a nonprofit online publisher whose mission is to enhance the health, management, and production of agricultural and horticultural crops. It achieves this mission through applied, science-based resources, like Focus on Tomato


  • Friday, May 08, 2015 12:30 PM | Anonymous

    Bon Appetit program

    For several years the Center for Innovative Food Technology (CIFT) has partnered with Bon Appetit Management Company in delivering fresh produce to consumers in the off-season.  Companies continue to explore methods in which to provide quality food products, support local growers, and enhance operations.  By combining resources, CIFT and Bon Appetit have been able to deliver a solution through IQF (Individually Quick Frozen) processing of local crops.  Thousands of pounds of produce have been frozen and integrated into menus of institutions in the winter months.  Crops such as strawberries, green beans, corn, apples and more, have been processed.  Each year this program provides another market for consideration by growers either currently producing the crops or interested in pursuing new items.  This remains to be the case as the following crops are being considered:

    • Peas
    • Green Beans
    • Brussels Sprouts
    • Raspberries
    • Strawberries
    • Sweet Corn
    • Edamame
    If you would like to learn more about the program and how to pursue this market channel, please contact Paula Ray, small business coordinator, CIFT, at 419-535-6000, ext. 117 or pray@ciftinnovation.org.


  • Wednesday, October 08, 2014 10:09 AM | Shelbi Hoffman (Administrator)

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